Tag Archive for: Intermodality

Connecting Europe Express

Written by: Lidia Slawinska

Written by: Lidia Slawinska – Digital Communications Manager Escola Europea – Intermodal Transport

As 2021 is drawing to a close, it is interesting to consider how far rail has progressed this year. With the 2021 Climate Conference highlighting the needs of the developed nations to hasten their efforts to curb CO2 emissions, the concept of rail has gained further promise in the eyes of many European governments. In this #DidYouKnow article, and in anticipation of the 2021 SURCO Operations II course which will take place in the first month of 2022, we decided to focus on one experiment recently launched by the European Union to try to evaluate the status of rail on the European continent – namely the Connecting Europe Express.

What is (was) the Connecting Europe Express?

The project was launched by the European Union to shine a spotlight on the various interoperability issues that currently plague the continent, as well as to highlight the cooperation of many companies and implicated parties from different nations. The project, which involved one train journey, lasted 36 days visiting 26 European countries with the ultimate goal of helping the public better understand what difficulties European rail faces in current times in efforts to become the preferred mode for both passengers and freight.

The actual “Express” comprised 3 gauges trains to allow for transit in all of the countries on the itinerary. Throughout its journey, which began on the 2nd of September 2021, the train traversed 20 000km through 33 border crossings. It made 100 stops and included 5 overnight trips. It did all of this with the support of more than 40 railway partners from numerous European countries.  It began its journey in Lisbon (Portugal) and arrived at its final destination in Paris on the 7th of October 2021.

Freight transport in the spotlight

There is no doubt that freight transport has a myriad of advantages over other forms of transport – notably in terms carbon emissions, comfort and cost. Though it is not without faults, it does provide an excellent solution to many transport companies who are seeking to diminish their carbon footprints and help bring to life the climate-protecting goals set by international organisations.

The Connecting Europe Express showed that through rail, both passengers and businesses could benefit. The project also shone a spotlight on the work that the European Union still has left in terms of conflicting and incomplete infrastructures that complicate the train journeys on the continent (the three gauges being one of the complications).

In terms of freight transport, the Express  was able to educate the public on the concept of the rolling roads. The train stopped at the Brenner Pass in Austria during its journey – a vital opportunity to highlight the advantages of train for truckers. The Brenner Pass is a connecting point from the road to the “rolling road” – a concept that allows trucks to pass certain segments of their journeys on the trains. The trucks can roll onto the trains, giving the drivers the opportunity to enjoy the comforts of a passenger train carriage. The rolling roads can now transport most types of lorries and have proven to be safe and cost-preserving (with the possibilities of avoiding tolls and fuel charges). The added publicity and awareness that was raised during this stop helped shine some light on such complementary options for truckers and road transport companies.

 The European Year Rail

This year has been declared the European Year of Rail. The European Union has spent the year promoting this mode of transport in spite of the complications imposed by the Covid-19 restrictions. The Connecting Europe Express was the EU’s flagship project – it helped both raise awareness for everything that rail has to offer, and to highlight what still must be done to ensure the optimal use of this mode.

Intermodal transport is the lifeline of the Escola Europea, and we have been offering courses that highlight the advantages and disadvantages of the various modes of transport since our inception. Rail became a staple of our courses in 2009 with the launch of SURCO (Simple Use Railway Connections). Our training offer continually adapts to the technological, environmental, and societal changes that take place in the sector, and the courses offer real-life case studies from professionals active in the sector. Our SURCO Operations II course also includes visits to Perpignan, where participants can witness actual rolling road operations in the Le Boulou Lorry Rail terminal.

If you are interested to learn more, you can head to the SURCO page on our website, or find out more about our upcoming course in January here.

Sources:

Puertos del Estado and the Escola Europea work to advance training in the field of transport

The Spanish Ports organisations – Puertos del Estado (PdE)– represented by its president Francisco Toledo – held a videoconference with representatives from the Escola Europea – led by Eduard Rodés – on the 15th of July 2020. This working meeting marked the starting point in the road towards the drafting of a general agreement between the two entities. The areas covered during the meeting include those maintained since 2004 for the promotion of short sea shipping. Puertos del Estado has promoted shortsea and railway courses, given partial scholarships for port authority staff and provided teachers since the Escola’s founding. Some of the teachers who have represented PdE in the Escola’s courses include Álvaro Rodriguez Dapena, Antonio Góngora and Jaime Luezas, who is also a member of the Escola’s Academic Committee on behalf of Puertos del Estado.

Alongside the main areas of activities of the Escola, other proposals in the field of education in the logistics-port communities and railway intermodality have also been analysed, some which are in the development phase and where there are points where collaboration could allow for important synergies.

Francisco Toledo undertook to work with his team on a more stable relationship framework with the Escola, based on ongoing projects and submitted proposals. The Escola and Puertos del Estado have been able to maintain a very good relationship of collaboration since 2004, before the Escola was founded in the shape and form that it is known today, following the first course that took place in 2004 with the Port of Barcelona. PdE has also been involved with the Shortsea Promotion Center of Spain in the development of the Escola since 2006 under the framework of the European Marco Polo Programme.

“It has been a lasting and fruitful relationship for both parties. We must now continue to add fuel to the fire to keep this collaboration alive, adapting it to the changes that are taking place” commented Rodés following the meeting. The director of the Escola also praised the president of the OPPE, outlining his profile as a connoisseur of the port business, a key point that facilitates his dialogue with and knowledge of the sector.

#DidYouKnow: Spotlight on Algeria

Mohamed Lazhar Benaissa

Mohamed Lazhar Benaissa Academic at the Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Technologie – ENST – Alger

In 2017 the Escola Europea, along with the Escola’s founding partners, has launched the MOS Magreb project. Its objective was to increase the cooperation between the countries in the North and South of the Mediterranean Sea. The project evolved into TransLogMed, which now counts with 42 partners from Spain, Italy, Morocco, Tunisia, Algeria, with the goal of incorporating other partners from Egypt in the future. The long-term objective of this project is to foster the development of the Motorways of the Sea between the Mediterranean countries, which will in turn help promoting inclusive growth and youth employability, as well as sustainable development in the region.

This month we have caught up with Mr. Mohamed Lazhar Benaissa, an academic at the École Nationale Supérieure de Technologie (ENST) in Alger, the deputy director for external relations and continuing education and a lecturer at the Escola Europea to give us an overview of the logistics scene in Algeria.

 

Logistics in Algeria

Algeria’s geographical location as the largest country in Africa, situated at the crossroads of important trade corridors (Europe-Africa, Mediterranean Sea), gives it the opportunity to play a major role in the field of logistics. To the north, Algeria has a 1,200 km long seafront overlooking the Mediterranean Sea and is home to 11 trading ports through which more than 95% of its foreign trade passes. However, this situation should not mask the numerous constraints related to the characteristics of these ports and their current organisation. According to the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, the Maritime Transport Connectivity Index [1]for Algeria in 2019 is only 12.81/100, far behind countries such as Egypt (66.72) and Morocco (58.19).  This is because the ports are often of ancient foundation[2] and are located within large cities that have prospered without sparing the land reserves necessary for their harmonious development. Whether first or second generation, these ports are subject to simple load breaks and do not meet the criteria that characterise modern logistics ports[3]. Currently the feedering used consists of coupling transoceanic containerised traffic headed towards large European ports with short-distance traffic headed towards Algeria, which increases the transit time of inputs. This will subsequently see their time lengthening once again during the transhipment operations. This results in insufficient yields and malfunctions that generate incessant bottlenecks and yields additional logistics costs.

The Algerian fleet

As regards the Algerian maritime fleet, as of the end of 2017, it was made up of 16 (often) obsolete units distributed among :

  1. 8 bulk carriers, 4 multi-purpose vessels and 2 RO-RO vessels belonging to the public company CNAN[4],
  2. 1 RO-RO and 1 bulk carrier belonging to the private company Nolis, a subsidiary of the Cevital[5]group.

What about containerisation?

As for containerisation, which has been gaining significant market share value over the past several years, it has proven of great benefit to foreign shipping lines as, in the virtual absence of the national flag, it allows them to freely set transport prices. According to World Bank figures[6], container traffic increased from 2007 to 2018 from 200.050 to 1.465.800 TEUs respectively, which is equivalent to an average annual growth rate of 20.6%. Given this growth opportunity, it is not surprising that we are witnessing the establishment of international terminal operators in Algerian ports such as the Singaporean Portek in Bejaia and the Emirati DP World in Algiers and Djendjen.

Where is Algeria on the digitisation scene?

During port passage, the lack of a rapid information systems makes it difficult to forecast the capacity of goods to be loaded, which, in the case of temperature-controlled products for example, would keep them on the quayside without any guarantees of preservation and respect for the cold chain. At the time of writing, only the Algerian customs can use a computer system called SIGAD in order to speed up the customs declaration circuit. In its most recent version, this system has a risk management system that classifies goods according to 3 circuits: green, orange and red. In the green circuit, goods are not subject to examination. In the orange circuit, the control consists of a documentary examination and in the red circuit, a physical inspection of the goods is required.

What of intermodal transport?

In terms of land transport infrastructure, Algeria has substantial networks whose quality has improved in recent years. Nevertheless, the motorway network is still insufficient and the lack of connections to several ports bears a cost. The rail network, for its part, is still in the process of development in terms of quality and coverage.

Road transport logistics, which dominates 90 per cent of goods flows, is only slightly outsourced by companies, since more than 50 per cent of the market is still handled by own-account transport. There is currently a growing awareness of the advantages of using transport for hire or reward and outsourcing the transport function, and the opportunities for growth for this sector are ample.

The provision of road transport services has long been a public monopoly. The opening up of the sector in 1988 led to an atomisation of the sector through the creation of very small companies with vehicles of all ages and of varying condition. It is therefore more a question of small-scale, or even informal activities that risk increasing the financial and organisational risks and reducing the scope to optimise the services offered. Air transport plays only a marginal role and rail freight activity, which is already weak, has been in inexorable decline for decades and is limited to heavy goods transport. Multimodal transport is almost non-existent.

Distribution is dominated by wholesalers present in most economic sectors and in particular in agri-food products (beverages, sugar, etc.). Few of them follow known logistics models, such as Numidis of the Cevital group. Indeed, with the exception of large conurbations (Algiers, Oran, Sétif…), where large modern warehouses are beginning to appear, storage facilities are of modest size (from 2 to 4,000 m²), of old-fashioned design, lack functionality and do not have special equipment such as loading docks. The players are either industrialists (acting on their own account), wholesalers or retail traders.

Logistics Warehouse in Algeria

Modern logistics warehouse in Bouira (Cevital)

Thus, logistics services are essentially limited to the subcontracting of transport operations.

Can you tell us a little bit more about the training situation in Algeria?

The current supply of training is insufficient in many areas, no doubt due to the lack of formal demand from the sector and a lack of impetus from the public authorities.

The Algerian authorities have been trying to improve the logistics situation since 2007, when the first master plan for the establishment of new logistics platforms was prepared. However, the implementation of the latter has not yet materialized. The other actions undertaken were :

  • The World Bank has been approached to prepare a logistics strategy and upgrade the legislative and regulatory framework, as several ministries and agencies are currently involved in logistics and are sometimes in conflict of jurisdiction;
  • The preparation of a project for the construction of a modern port in Hamadania about 100 km west of Algiers with a Chinese partnership;
  • Digitisation through the implementation of an electronic port one-stop shop. This will help unite the whole logistics chain of the ports and the segments that interact in its activities. It will also enable the digitisation of procedures and a better coordination and planning of port operations.

One can already wonder whether these actions will end up putting logistics in Algeria on the rails of modernity.

 

References:

[1] https://unctadstat.unctad.org/wds/TableViewer/tableView.aspx

[2] With the exception of the oil ports of Arzew, Skikda and the general cargo port of Djendjen, built after Independence, the rest of the infrastructure was built between 1840 and 1959, initially built to allow exports during the time of colonization.

[3] Algerian ports are characterised by shallow draughts and narrow gravel pits, which are incompatible with modern port operating requirements.

[4] The average age of the CNAN fleet is between 30 and 35 years, which corresponds to that of the technical reform.

[5] The two Nolis vessels are mainly used to cover the transport needs of the Cevital group.

[6] Site https://donnees.banquemondiale.org/indicateur/IS.SHP.GOOD.TU?locations=DZ consulted in May 2020

The Escola Europea celebrates another year of the MOST Iberia course for professionals

The Escola Europea has welcomed about twenty Spanish and Portuguese speaking professionals for the third edition of the MOST Iberia course.

On this occasion, the group comprising professionals from the Spanish and Portuguese logistics-port sectors met in Barcelona to embark on a 4-day course on intermodal logistics and motorways of the sea, and expand their professional and human networks. During a crossing of Grimaldi Lines’ Ro-Pax ferry that connects Barcelona with Civitavecchia, the professionals shared between themselves knowledge, idiosyncrasies and previous experiences from each one of their countries.

Companies and administrations such as Bytemaster, the Santander Port Authority, Casintra, OIA Global, CETEG, the BEST terminal and Grimaldi Lines itself have sent their representatives to take advantage of the training. As for the Portuguese delegation, members of public entities such as the Instituto da Mobilidade e dos Transportes, the Aveiro Port Authority and the Escola Náutica Infante Don Henrique participated.

The group was accompanied by a panel of expert professors that included Francisco Javier Valencia, the Maritime Captain of the Port of Barcelona, Antonio Vargas, an advisor of Grimaldi Logística España, Eduardo Bandeira, the director of Intermodal Portugal, Eduard Rodés, the director of the Escola and Vanessa Bexiga, Operations Manager of the Escola.

At the end of the course, the participants tackled a case study that presented a real-life scenario of short sea shipping viability, applying direct and external cost calculations to evaluate the alternatives from not only an economic point of view but taking account of environmental and social characteristics as well. “It has been a pleasant experience in which it was possible to know the points of view of the different actors in the logistics chain. The teachers are very well prepared, it is a pleasure to listen to things told with a passion for what they do”, commented a participant from Bytemaster.

Circle of the Sustainable Development Goals - SDG

And Greta went to New York

Source: un.org

An ever-changing world

It is the time when autumn arrives at the northern hemisphere, and with it a new edition of our cherished Odiseo. The edition which will feature aspects of sustainability which arose spontaneously. When we reviewed the topics we wanted to deal with, we realised that almost all of them were facing the same direction.

It coincides with the timing of Greta Thunberg’s trip to New York, following an invitation from the United Nations to participate in a climate summit at the United Nations. On her arrival, a fleet of 17 UN boats (one for each of the Sustainable Development Goals) received her in New York waters to accompany her on the last leg of her journey.

Source: europa.eu

It seems incredible how this young Swede, at only 16 years of age, is succeeding in mobilising an enormous number of people among whom are many of the world’s most important politicians. For those of you who want to get to know her better, I recommend viewing her speech in the European Parliament last April. Her message touches the heart and moves to action.  She made an impassioned plea for the planet urging MEPs to “start panicking about climate change” rather than “waste time arguing about Brexit.”

The world’s great powerhouses are beginning to worry about much of what is happening. The United Nations is a frontrunner in particular, following its magnificent awareness campaign of the eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) published in 2000: halving extreme poverty rates, universal primary education, gender equality and empowerment of women, reducing child mortality, improving maternal health, halting the spread of HIV/AIDS and malaria, environmental sustainability and a global partnership for development, all by a 2015 deadline. Which, incredibly, was met!

Today we are presented with the Sustainable Development Goals, a plan to achieve a better and more sustainable future for all. These address the global challenges we face, including those related to poverty, inequality, climate change, environmental degradation, prosperity, peace and justice. The Goals are interlinked and, if we are not to leave anyone behind, it is important that we attain each Goal by 2030.

Some may consider it more of a marketing campaign than a Real Action Programme, but I sincerely believe that today we are what we know and what we need to be, so let us celebrate the use of marketing as a lever of change. I know that the world is better today than 15 years ago and even more so than 30 years ago. We must continue to set goals, even if they seem utopian, to keep us moving forward.  It is as Eduardo Galeano said: “Utopia is on the horizon. I walk two steps, she moves two steps away and the horizon runs ten steps further. So what is Utopia for? For that; it is good for walking.”

Today Utopia can simply stand for complying with the SDG’s. This includes everyone’s involvement, starting with each one at an individual level and moving through the projects we work on and the politicians and policies we vote on.

The implications for the port sector

Institutions such as the Port Authority of Barcelona are taking a new look at how to act in light of these objectives. In the port’s latest reports on Corporate Social Responsibility, and in other management reports, the SDG related to the activities carried out are highlighted. I can assure you that they are changing the way we look at the work to be done and that we are becoming increasingly more aware of the impact of our decisions and actions on the achievement of objectives. There is an important movement, which we will introduce in more detail later, that seeks to transform the ports into SMART PORTS. We will be able to see this better at the Smart City Expo Congress that will be held from 19 to 21 November in Barcelona and which for the first time will have a space dedicated to ports. The ports of Barcelona, Antwerp, Rotterdam, Los Angeles and Montreal will come together to lead a global movement for improvement in the port area.

The implication for operators

We can see that sustainability in the transport sector has become one of the fundamental elements on a daily basis. Companies highlight the social impact of their activities, both in terms of external costs and polluting emissions.

Grimaldi presents vessels that contaminate less during port stays, and has begun associating itself with the Clean Shipping Alliance 2020 (CSA 2020). CSA 2020 defines itself as a group of leading companies from the commercial shipping and cruise industries that have been leaders in emission control efforts and have made significant investments in research and analysis, funding and committing resources to comply with 2020 fuel requirements through the development and use of Exhaust Gas Cleaning Systems (EGCS).

Shipping companies, port terminals, and land transport operators (both rail and road) are changing the way they conduct their operations. It seems clear that the European Commission’s principle that the polluter pays and the user pays will eventually be imposed not only at a European but possibly at international level as well.

 

How can we implicate ourselves?

Aristotle considered that attaining the fullness of the expression of human capabilities is the meaning and end of every individual.

Therefore, let me raise this virtue, the SDGs, as a collective objective, as a new project. A project you can work on.

The eight objectives for human development in 2000 positioned people in the epicentre of development.  They focused on potential development, about increasing possibilities and enjoying the freedom to live life.

Human development is the acquisition of the capacity to participate effectively in the construction of a prosperous society in both a material and spiritual sense; it is an integral part of the individual attaining a deeper knowledge of himself – externally and (perhaps more so) internally, more intimately within him- or herself.

The objectives have to reorient the way in which we understand life and society.

I believe in a humanism in which the construction of collective solutions involves individual action. The construction of global solution passes through the construction of oneself, and the routine day-to-day work paves the way for the progress of humanity and a better world for all.

I would like to highlight a few of the objectives.

Quality education understood as a duty for life. Our education and that of those who at some point depend on us: children, employees, relatives. Let us value having been born into a society that has provided us with access to exceptional education.

 

 

 

Gender equality is not only a fundamental human right, but the necessary foundation for a peaceful, prosperous and sustainable world. A society, organization or person who does not understand that we all have the same rights and obligations is ill. If you have to hire, pay, distribute and organize the work always seek this equality.

 

 

Decent work and economic growth: I don’t like using the word growth when referring to the economy. In my opinion, the challenge is to create employment without growing. On the surface it may seem like a paradox, but it is a different way of looking at things.

To end let me go back to the classics. Firstly, the concept of virtue that Aristotle left in his books on ethics, dedicated to his son Nicomacheus:

“Since, then, the present inquiry does not aim at theoretical knowledge like the others (for we are inquiring not in order to know what arete, virtue, is, but in order to become good, since otherwise our inquiry would have been of no use), we must examine the nature of actions.” (Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics, II, 2).

Vicenç Molina, a friend and mentor and what today would be called an influencer, brought it closer to our daily reality:

“Let us start, therefore, with the practice: working practically.

With the values raised, with the commitment achieved.

With constructive impetus. Poetically, without surprises or shrieks because, at its root, poetry is construction.

So, we do not have to be cut off… Or naive, but natural, real, feasible, civic…”

It is a wonderful reflection that should help us face our citizenry with love to the things that, in the end, will be important.

Each of us should be part of this project. All of us have values that we can bring to the surface, something which we can achieve by struggling to build ourselves. With creativity, with dialogue and cooperation, with self-determination, with work and effort, with commitment to people, and with knowledge and wisdom.

Let us all be accomplices in this great challenge, and may the road ahead present us with luck and happiness throughout the coming Millenia. I hope you will enjoy the articles in this Odiseo as much as I have.

Regards

 

Eduard Rodés

Director

Escola Europea

The Ormeggiatori and Barcaioli Group collaborates with the Escola in “Formati al Porto

The director of the Ormeggiatori e Barcaioli di Civitavecchia group, Angelo Bonomo, together with the director of the Escola Europea Eduard Rodés have signed a tri-annual collaboration agreement for the Formati al Porto project, guaranteeing the availability of guided maritime tours of the Port of Civitavecchia.

The new project Formati al Porto, strongly supported by the Ports of Rome (dall’AdSP del Mar Tirreno Centro Settentrionale) and the Escola, aims to bring today’s students and future professionals, closer to the knowledge of the professions of the logistics sector, with a particular focus on maritime and intermodal transport.

Today the logistical positioning of the port of Civitavecchia, both in terms of territorial and socio-economic aspects, must take infrastructural measures, offer competitive services and, above all, invest in the human factor: as a well-prepared logistical community, capable of facing future challenges and strategically placing Civitavecchia at the forefront of the logistical activity of the Mediterranean, is paramount.

The main goal of Formati al Porto is to get in touch with the community, discover port activities and to learn about the characteristics of port-related professions directlty from the individuals immersed in the sector. Students will explore the infrastructures, facilities and operations directly. In addition, the project will improve the alignment between the qualifications required by the companies and the skills offered by the local education system.

The Ormeggiatori Group (specialising in mooring activities) has always worked to safeguard the safety of navigation, port facilities, the environment and human lives, ensuring the smooth running of traffic within the port area. The cooperation agreement signed with the Escola cements the Group’s commitment to ensure the smooth conduct of guided maritime tours within the port area of Civitavecchia.

The Escola Europea has previous experience with this type of programme. A pre-cursor – the Forma’t al Port project – was launched in 2014 in Barcelona. The initiative was a success and after the first three years the agreements with sponsors and partners were renewed at the beginning of 2018 for another three years with more educational centers willing to participate.

The courses is taught by experts and professionals from the Italian and Spanish sectors, ensuring that the participants receive high quality educational contents. The teaching team for Formati al Porto is yet to be confirmed, but it will be composed of representatives of companies and institutions directly involved in the management of short sea shipping activiites in Italy.

The course, in addition to being able to count on the support of the Italian Ministry of Infrastructure and Transport, has the support of important associations in the sector, including: Assoporti, Confitarma, Assassatori.

The pilot Formati al Porto course is scheduled to take place in the autumn 2019.

A full list of the Escola’s courses and their programmes can be found here: https://escolaeuropea.eu/training/.

SURCO workshop - Group photo

The Escola Europea trains professionals in port-railway operations

After the successes obtained in the past editions of the SURCO series, the Escola has once again held the SURCO Operations I course for Spanish professionals, which offers introductory training in matters of rail-port and intermodal railway logistics.

The course took place from the 10th to the 12th of June in Barcelona. Designed for professionals from freight transport companies, freight forwarders and import and export companies, the course offers an analysis of the different elements necessary to carry out efficient intermodal transport solutions (rail and sea). This month companies such as Inditex, Repsol, Inovyn, the ports of Huelva and Bilbao, Hellmann Worldwide Logistics, Marcotran and Ocidenave sent participants to partake in the training.

During the three days, the course participants had the opportunity to see the infrastructures and equipment used in the rail-port connections and to have contact with operators that currently manage these types of operations. The theoretical classes covered maritime-rail transport and logistics, railway services necessary for the transport of goods and railway terminals in ports. The training also offered a detailed analysis of the current situation of Spanish ports in terms of infrastructures, characteristics of the railway networks and service areas.

To complement the theoretical classes, the course offered practical visits to the Port of Barcelona (Hutchison BEST semi-automatic container terminal, AUTOTERMINAL vehicle terminal and ICL solid bulk terminal); a visit to the CAN TUNIS complex, and in particular to the sorting terminal and logistic operator LOGISTAINER; and a visit to ADIF’s integrated traffic control centre.

SURCO Operations I was carried out with the collaboration of the Port of Barcelona, Puertos del Estado, Adif, Autoterminal, FGC Ferrocarrils, ICL, the Hutchison BEST terminal, Transportes Portuarios, Go Transport and Transportes Tomàs.

The Escola commits to work together with YoungShip organisations of Europe

On the 7th of June 2019, the director of the Escola Europea Eduard Rodés met with co-founders of the YoungShip organisations of Spain, Italy, Portugal and France to discuss fruitful and economic collaboration between the institution and the young professionals associations. The youth associations, represented by Javier Mendés (Spain), Raquel Nunes (Portugal, and Ansam Okbanir respectively, visited the Escola’s headquarters to attend the joint conference of YoungShip France & Spain titled “The Cruise Industry in the Mediterranean: Challenges and Opportunities”.

The signature of the agreement constitutes the kick-off of a new partnership that will help to bring together the three youth associations in training projects in order to prepare, train and educate young people on the policy of promoting intermodality, as supported by the EU. YoungShip is an international non-profit association that provides a voice for all young people in the maritime sector. YoungShip International has a clear role to play in engaging, inspiring and working with the industry to promote bright young minds in the maritime industry for the development of future progress.

More specifically, during the meeting, the parties agreed to work together to offer courses and training, as developed by the Escola, at a discounted price to members of the YoungShip family in Portugal, France, Italy and Spain. The Escola would work together to prepare, train and educate young people to the policy of promoting intermodality promoted by the EU.

Under the agreement the Escola would also hold a training and networking course every 2 years between the members of the YoungShip’s members at an international level. The courses, though also focused on the intermodal transport of goods, would count with the customisation of contents by YoungShip’s organisers, and would provide ample opportunities for networking and professional collaborations. On their part, the YoungShip organisations agreed to promote and support the training offers of the courses that the Escola offers among their member bases, both by increasing the institution’s visibility on their respective websites and through the design and development of specialised courses in the field of intermodal logistics chains, facilitating the participation of their technical staff in the preparation of the contents and the holding of workshops.

The agreement will be valid for a period of 36 months and, depending on the rate of success, will have the possibility to be extended on an annual basis thereafter.

For more information about the YoungShip’s organisations, you can visit the website: http://www.youngship.com/departments/ and search for the participating countries.

Forma’t al Port fills the Escola’s classrooms in the first quarter of 2018

Three hundred and sixty students of higher education courses from thirteen Catalan institutes have filled the classrooms of the Escola Europea during the seven Introduction courses of the Forma’t al Port project organized so far this year.

The participating institutes were: The UAB Foundation (Fundación UAB), the Centre for Polytechnic Studies; Sant Francesc, Prat and López Vicuña Centres for Studies; La Salle Gràcia, Les Salines, Jaume Mimó, Poblenou, Lluïsa Cura, Estela Ibèrica and  Joan Brossa Institutes as well as the Escola del Treball from Lleida.

The main objective of the two-day-long Introduction course is to supply upper cycle first-year students of International Trade and Transport and Logistics with a first-hand experience of the Port of Barcelona, its infrastructures, logistical equipment and port operations. In addition, the companies of port community have the opportunity to promote their activities and the professional profiles they seek for their work force. Finally, the course creates a space for dialogue to encourage exchanges between training centres and companies, and thus promote the hiring of students in programmes of dual training.

Introduction characterises the first level of the Forma’t al Port programme and is considered preparatory for the more complex three-day-long Management course, during which participants receive training on board of one of the vessels that covers the regular short sea shipping route between Barcelona (Spain) and Genoa (Italy).

The Forma’t al Port project was launched in 2014 in Barcelona by the Port of Barcelona, Barcelona-Catalunya Logistics Centre, the Barcelona Provincial Council (la Diputació de Barcelona) and the Escola Europea. The first triennium of activities took place between 2015-2017 and had a great drawing power, giving very positive results. This paved the way for a new triennium 2018-2020, which welcomes back the centres already loyal to the programme alongside the addition of new institutes.

For more information, you can visit the website of the project: https://www.escolaeuropea.eu/training/our-courses/#format.

Tag Archive for: Intermodality

Nothing Found

Sorry, no posts matched your criteria