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#DidYouKnow – The increasing threat of cyber attacks on port

Living in an increasingly digitised world has decreased distances between countries. The world doesn’t seem to be vast anymore – countries in the northern hemisphere can get tropical fruits from the southern hemisphere (and vice versa) at a few days’ notice. Communication between different countries has become instantaneous. The increasing innovations have made our planet seem a lot smaller.

The port sector has also been riding this innovation wave. In the final years of the twentieth century, and in the first decades of the twenty first century, ports have been going through a digital transformation to keep up with any new challenges, optimising their operations and creating new strategies (including automation, RFID tagging, etc). All of this has been centred on the ability to interconnect information technologies and operation technologies, cloud computing, the internet of things, big data, among others.

All this modernisation has come at a price – and digital innovation has given rise to cyber threats and cyber-attacks. This has not left any industries unaffected. Ports, as vital infrastructure points to nation-states – have become frequent targets to both national, international and clandestine attacks. During their own digitalisation efforts, ports need to ensure that cybersecurity stays at the forefront, whilst being considered a facilitator of automation and future developments. The transition into the digital sphere has thus morphed into cybersecurity challenges that ports need to address before realising the complete potential of innovative technologies. This is why we decided to deal with cybersecurity in ports for this month’s #DidYouKnow article.

What kinds of cyber threats exist for ports?

Making sure that ports are safe from cyber threats is critical towards ensuring safe and secure operations of ships both at sea and onshore. This is not a new issue – the International Maritime Organization (IMO) has already adopted various resolutions that aim to minimize (if not eliminate) cyber risks in the maritime industry. For example, under the IMO’s resolution MSC.428(98), port administrations need to ensure that the systems that are in place in their communities appropriately address any risks or security concerns for vessels that may exist in cyberspace. This is because port operations are vital in international and national maritime trade. It is within their boundaries that vessels arrive, load, and unload their cargoes, top up fuel, and carry out other vital information towards the proper functioning of the global supply chain.

In the modern digital world, port cybersecurity must be seen as a top priority for any transport operation

There are many types of cyber risks that can affect ports and their operations. These can be grouped the following 7 categories (which are by no means finite as the digital sphere is a constantly evolving creature).

  • Eavesdropping, interception, hijacking -This group of risks includes, but is not limited to, incidents such as the interception of emissions, sensitive information, network reconnaissance, network traffic manipulation, etc.
  • Nefarious activity & abuse – This group of risks includes, but is not limited to, incidents such as the denial of service, malware, brute force, identity theft, phishing, targeted attacks, abuse and theft of data, manipulation of information, etc.
  • Disaster – These risks can emerge as a result of environmental disasters, natural disasters, etc.
  • Unintentional damage – These can include the use of unreliable sources, erroneous administration of IT/OT systems, information leakage, among others.
  • Failures and Malfunctions – Any information system always has the potential to fail or malfunction. This group of risks includes failures to systems, devices, navigation and communication systems, main supply systems, failure or disruption of service providers, etc.
  • Outages – As information and digital systems depend on the energy grids, these risks include any possible main supply outages, network outages, absence of personnel, loss of support, etc.
  • Physical attacks – perhaps the group most associated with the general term of “cyberattacks”. This category includes fraud, sabotage, vandalism, theft, unauthorised access, terrorism, hacktivism, piracy, coercion, extortion, or corruption

What are the legal frameworks?

IMO Resolutions

Providing worldwide cybersecurity guidance for ports is the International Maritime Organization. Various resolutions have already been passed by the organisation to try to create standards for ports and shipping lines to follow to ensure maximum cyber security and cyber regulatory frameworks that minimise the risks for all parties, including ISO/IEC 27001 and the Guidelines on Cyber Security on Board Ships.

SOLAS

SOLAS – or the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea – is a treaty that has established the minimum safety standards for shipping. It covers requirements for equipment, construction, and the general operation of vessels. It has been adopted by over 150 nation-states. In terms of cyber security, its Chapter IX — Management for the Safe Operation of Ships — requires every shipping line and any person or company that is responsible for a vessel to comply with the International Safety Management Code (ISM). This code has been adapted to include sections on cybersecurity concerns.

ENISA

ENISA is the European Union Agency for Cybersecurity. In 2019 its position was strengthened with the EU Cybersecurity Act, which also defined a general framework for Information, Communication and Technology products, processes, and services. All EU member states need to comply with the ENISA requirements, though there are some that have also adopted their own national initiatives to further shield themselves from cyber risks. This includes the French CIIP law, the German “IT-Grundschutz” and the UL Cyber Security Code of Practices, among others.

 

Conclusions

This #DidYouKnow article is by no means an extensive deep-dive into the world of cyber security – as it is a very broad and complex topic that only specialised cyber professionals could explain. It does offer, nevertheless, a glimpse into the complexity of issues that arose with the digitalisation of our modern world.

Ports are not immune to the cyber risks, no matter how digitised and seemingly prepared they are. Most of such attacks involve people and fragmented system landscapes, and therefore every port community is potentially at risk. The digital divide shouldn’t be ignored – and the fact that the maritime world is central to keeping global supply chains moving and thus is crucial to information exchanges associated with them further highlights the shared nature of cybersecurity risks. Therefore, for the maritime world to function effectively, the management of cyber risks must be carried out properly and shared with all stakeholders, ranging from port authorities, shipping operators, port facilities and terminals, maritime agencies, customs agents and maritime law enforcement agencies. The cyberworld does not have physical borders, and therefore the mitigation of any threats there is trickier.

Cybersecurity in port operations is no easy (nor isolated) feat. It is essential for all partners involved in transport operations to be aware of the risks involved and to learn to take the necessary steps to prevent or stop any potential threats that may develop. This includes following good practices that certain port operators may establish to reach a baseline of cybersecurity. In 2020, the port industry has faced a fourfold increase in cyber attacks against OT systems (a fourfold increase from 2017). Cyber-attacks are unfortunately becoming common. Therefore it is important to note that, at the end of the day, port operations and cybersecurity in the twenty first century are two sides of the same coin.

Intrigued? The Escola Europea is organising a summer school in port operations – with a focus on vessels and goods that are processed through the Port of Barcelona in the month of July. In the course we go over all the aspects of port operations, including the new cyber threats and their mitigation procedures. Check out the programme on our website.

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Forma't al Port Management - December 2021

Discovering the Port and Forma’t al Port: teachers and students get to know the Port of Barcelona in the final weeks of the year

The Forma’t al Port programme managed to recover the numbers of students trained pre-pandemic and trained 590 students in a single year; while the “Discover the Port” initiative was born to give visibility to the port professions to educators.

The Discover the Port initiative has been born with the help of the Port of Barcelona, the Escola Europea and the actors of the training and occupation board of the logistics-port community of Barcelona. Through this programme more than 40 teachers and educators of institutes of Barcelona have been able to learn about the new strategic plan of the Port of Barcelona, along with the update of the study of professional profiles of the port community of Barcelona and that of the infrastructures and companies that accommodate new job opportunities for young people in the area.

This programme aims to inform teachers of the professional profiles that are most in demand and difficult to cover, in order for them to be able to identify and guide potential candidates for these jobs and advise them in their academic and professional career.

Similarly, for students already familiar with the sector, the Forma’t al Port programme was reinvented in a hybrid format to bring the Port of Barcelona and its activities closer to students of Transport and Logistics and International Trade, and to students of the Logistics and Maritime Business Degree, both virtually and in person during the year of health-crisis related restrictions.

In the first half of the year, 530 students attended the Forma’t al Port – Introduction course, which consists of lectures by the different players in the port logistics community, as well as virtual visits to the Port of Barcelona. The students also got to know the Port’s facilities in person through a visit scheduled during a pandemic-safe period of the year.

At the end of the year, in November and December, the Forma’t training returned to its original 100% classroom format and two editions of the Forma’t al Port – Management course were held on board GNV and Grimaldi Lines vessels with a total of 60 participants. The experience proved to be very enriching, as the students were able to interact with their peers from different institutes and the trainers in a safe space.

In view of the success of the programme in recent years, several training centres have applied for partnership in order to be able to offer their students this specialised training. The Escola Europea, the organiser of the courses, is looking for new local sponsors to increase the number of centres and students who can take the courses.

In 2022 the Escola’s team plans to restart face-to-face activities, if the situation permits, and to continue the work of bringing the Barcelona port-logistics community closer to its future professionals.

For more information about Forma’t al Port courses, please contact the programme manager: Marta Miquel – marta.miquel@escolaeuropea.eu.

Diploma ceremony held on the 3rd of July 2021

Escola’s restarts its MOST courses

Last Saturday, on the 3rd of July, the intermodal transport course “Motorways of the Sea training – MOST” started in Barcelona. In total, thirty five students from 11 different nationalities studying Master’s programmes in Logistics and International Trade, Internationalisation of SMEs and Customs Law and Management at the University of Barcelona participated in the 4-day long training.

The day began with a solemn ceremony to present diplomas to some 100 graduates which, exceptionally and due to health safety measures, was held outdoors in front of the Escola Europea’s headquarters, at Placeta de l’Areté, Terminal Drassanes on the Moll de Barcelona.  On behalf of the Port of Barcelona and the Escola, its director, Eduard Rodés, welcomed the participants.  On behalf of the University of Barcelona, Dr. Oscar Mascarilla, director of the Master’s programmes, spoke. The Honourable Ramon Tremosa, Minister of Business and Knowledge of the Generalitat de Catalunya until a few weeks ago, supported the event and addressed the students, encouraging them to put their knowledge at the service of the competitiveness of their respective countries. Afterwards, the participants and their accompanying family members made a maritime visit to the Port of Barcelona.

The MOST course started early in the afternoon on the same day, and the group departed for Civitavecchia – the port of Rome – on board of the Grimaldi RO-PAX vessel “Cruise Barcelona”. The teachers of the Escola Europea on this occasion were Marta Miquel, the Chief Operating Officer, Antonio Vargas, representing Grimaldi Lines and Eduard Rodés, as course director.

Simultaneously, the first two weeks of July saw the start of the Escola’s annual Summer School in Port Operations for Vessels and for Goods. The course is held in classroom in-person format with the participation of 16 students from Egypt, Yemen and Somalia.

The MOST course is the first on-board course that the Escola was able to hold since the start of the pandemic in March 2020. It is a promising sign showing the ability of the Escola to begin to bring its unique experiential courses back into play.

Container ship in Port

The road towards sustainable port operations

This month, in anticipation of our annual summer school on port operations, we thought we would tackle the topic of sustainable ports, with a break down of practical measures being taken by ports to reach net-zero emissions in the next three decades.

Written by

Written by: Lidia Slawinska, Consultant

In recent years, smart and sustainable have become interchangeable when talking about the future of transport. With the goal of working towards a more connected, intelligent and sustainable world, port authorities and port operators across the globe have been actively working in line with the UN’s 17 Sustainable Development Goals which work to improve financial and social inclusion, support humanitarian efforts, facilitate access to education and to health services, and to combat climate change. All partners have agreed that this is necessary to help build a sustainable world for future generations – and actors involved in transport operations have a particularly large part to play.

The IMO has predicted in recent years that maritime transport will continue to increase over the next decades, culminating with a rate 250% higher in 2050 than what we see today. Knowing that maritime transport already contributes nearly 3% of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions, it is evident that the industry needs to change to ensure that the increased rate does not counterbalance any global sustainability efforts.

Ports play a key role in the development and maintenance of efficient and supply chains, and therefore they will also play a key role in their redesigns to make them sustainable in the effort to achieve net zero emissions of shipping operations by 2050. One way that ports have started to do that is to invest in electrification.

Ports as energy hubs

Container operations at the Port of Rotterdam

Container operations at the Port of Rotterdam

The concept of having ports used as energy hubs for the shipping world is an enticing one. Imagining that the infrastructure could serve as a sustainable operation, with electrified terminals, reach stackers, loading cranes, etc., and then knowing that the onshore power supply points could also help maintain low emissions of vessels in port and at sea is very appealing. Digitalisation will be the enabler of this process of bringing electricity closer to the different intermodal transport modes through ports – through electrification processes – and will open doors to new innovative solutions, alternative business strategies and intelligent controls. Connected carries, cargo and people will make sure that transport transactions are transparent, traceable, and trustworthy. Ports can serve as the energy hubs that make all of this possible.

Electrification

Electrification is already spreading through the shipping world. It can be done to ships to make sure that they consume fewer fossil fuels and therefore lower their carbon footprint. Other forms of transport, as well as the supporting infrastructure provided by ports, if electrified, can substantially help increase the sustainability of maritime operations. As an added bonus, electrified ports also emit lower noise pollution, therewith improving their relationships with the neighbouring cities.

Electrification is also inextricably linked to sustainability. As more and more carriers invest in either fully electric or hybrid motors, ports are expected to offer onshore power supply stations, which in turn puts more demand on the creation of relevant infrastructures. As a result, those ports that invest in the innovative infrastructures transform into important nodes with substantial power needs which would need to be taken from a nearby electricity grids. This is because visiting ships, regardless of the duration of their stays in the port, will want to recharge their batteries to make sure that they have enough energy for subsequent transport legs all the while getting energy to support their stays in the ports themselves. As a result, ports will become large electricity consumers, ready to cater for both large and alternating load requirements – all of which will depend on the stability of the electricity supply.

One example of a European port that has successfully incorporated electrification efforts is that of the Port of Tyne in the Northeast of England. Its electrification projects, among other initiatives that helped it win the UK Clean Maritime Operator Award in 2020, have contributed to the cutting of the port’s fossil fuel consumption by 260,000 litres, reducing energy use by 2.3 million kWh and eliminating more than 1,500 tonnes of carbon dioxide.

New technologies moving ports closer to full electrification

Alongside onshore power supply points, there are other technological developments that are helping ports on the path towards full electrification. One such development was recently announced by Hyster Europe, during the TOC Global Showcase. Having spent years working on zero-emission container handling solutions, Hyster’s catalogue of port equipment that utilises lithium-ion batteries and other fuel cell technologies got more extensive. Having partnered up with Capacity Trucks, Hyster is now working on the creation of electric, hydrogen and automation ready terminal tractors. The most interesting part of these developments is the use of hydrogen fuel cells – something that the company has been investing in and working on since 2017.

The Ports of Auckland Ltd is another example of bringing ports closer to the innovative and sustainable solutions of tomorrow. With an impressive goal of reaching zero emissions by 2040, the port operator has incorporated a wide range of solutions including automated straddle carriers and expanding the terminal’s overall annual capacity. Alongside this, the port has invested in fully electric tugboats, built by Damen Shipyards and powered by Echandia’s E-LTO batteries, which can sustain more than 70 tonnes of bollard pull.

Etug at the Ports of Auckland

Credit: Damen Shipyards

More efficient port management

Apart from investing in new technologies to reach their sustainability goals, ports also need to optimise their port processes and operating procedures to improve turnaround time, decrease time spent idling in ports, and therewith improving the overall maritime transport operation. Digitalisation is key in this – as ensuring smooth and reliable digital connectivity between all transport operators can only help make the planning and follow-throughs of any processes more efficient.

5G is already being tested to try to increase the speed of data exchanges between different transport parties, with the Internet of Things, AI, and digital twins set to help increase the overall reliability of port operations, and therewith contribute towards efficient port management models.

Concluding thoughts

It is not a secret that the maritime sector accounts for around 3 percent of the word’s total GHG emissions. As most the world’s transport relies on the maritime route (and the current trend shows the number increasing significantly in the next 3 decades), it is imperative for any actors involved in maritime operations to make sure that fossil fuels are eliminated (to the extent that it is possible) and substituted (or complemented by) renewable alternatives. As maritime transport does not exist without ports, bringing sustainability to them seems like a necessity to help greenify the sector. Electrification and digitalisation are two such steps that ports can take to work towards that goal – and therewith ensure a clean and green supply chain that supports our globalised world.

Sources:

The Ship Agent

When we think about the arrival of a vessel to the port, the first thing we think about is the loading or discharging of the cargo. Even though this is not entirely incorrect, many ships have more specific requirements and needs upon arrival. This is where the role of the ship agent comes in, and this is what we chose to focus on in this post for our #DidYouKnow series.

Sustainable Development Goals wheel

The Escola Europea reaffirms its commitment to training and the Motorways of the Sea

Days away from 2020, the Escola Europea reflects on the achievements made during the year. The Sustainable Development Goals have been set to solidify the urgent changes that society would need to make to tackle social inequality, climate change, poverty, and political turmoil, among others.

With this in light, the Escola’s work this year can be summarised as follows:

  • In 2019, the Escola has organised a staggering 42 courses (nearing one course per week), and welcomed participants from Spain, Belgium, Italy, France, the Netherlands, Morocco, Algeria, Peru, Colombia and Mexico. There was an increase in the number of participants coming from the Magred, which could be explained with the success of the TransLogMED project and the growth of the North African trade networks. In total, 1,485 students passed through the Escola’s doors and took advantage of the unique course-workshops.
  • 2019 also saw the creation and fulfilment of new technical courses. Curricula and course programmes were prepared for the Temperature-Controlled Freight transport Course, detailed plan were made for the Port Operations Summer school (which now took the form of a 2 week course, separated by vessels and goods), and the Groupage and Consolidation Course was further extended. Successful courses were also carried out for the former two technical courses, with a Groupage course planned for the spring of 2020.
  • The Escola’s courses are constantly undergoing improvements and modifications. In 2019 the team created a Log Book to give to the students at the start of each course, which contains tasks, puzzles and activities that further enrich the participants’ experiences.
  • Formati al Porto was officially launched in Italy, demonstrating the huge success the programme has attained in Barcelona and its appeal to other termional communities.
  • The Escola has had it’s first paper published in a conference – the annual World of Shipping International Research Conference on Maritime Affairs. The paper, which can be found here, summarised the current state of experiential training methods in Europe, and provided a quantitative analysis of the approach applied to the Escola’s courses. Thank you to all of the Escola’s partners and alumni who have generously submitted their survey responses to help us carry out the study.

2020 shows all signs of being a very intensive one for the Escola Europea, with technical courses for professionals planned for the spring, the summer school, and the usual MOST courses in the autumn. In the past decade, the organisation has increased its influence in Europe and throughout the Mediterranean through the development of new and innovative courses for students and professionals, the signing of new agreements with influential universities and training centres, and the active participation in European projects, and 2019 has shown that it is continuing to do so, whilst applying the Sustainable Development Goals to its activities.

For more information, visit the Escola’s website at www.escolaeuropea.eu or write to info@escolaeuropea.eu.

Participants of the Port Operations during a workshop

The Escola Europea completes the first semester of course with the Summer School in Port Operations

With the arrival of summer, the Escola ended its activities in the first semester of 2019. The past few months have been very busy for the training centre, providing specialised training to both students and professionals in the sector.

During these 6 months, more than 1100 students from Europe, Latin America and North Africa have attended 28 courses to receive training in maritime and rail intermodality, temperature-controlled supply chains and port operations.

During the first two weeks of July, the Escola has welcomed professionals and students of different nationalities to the Summer School in Port Operations. The course consisted of two weeks, each with a specific focus: the first on services to vessels and the second on freight operations in ports.

The training, in addition to including practical workshops to different places in the port of Barcelona, such as visits to the control tower, the border inspection point, the tugboat facilities, as well as terminals for each type of merchandise, has allowed participants to uncover the theories that underpin the dynamics of the port community and its operations from the perspective of terminals, cargo and agents.

The participants became familiar with the services offered to ships, port security protocols, customs procedures, and risk management of dangerous products and emergencies. They have also been introduced to the environmental aspects of port area management so that they can begin to consider the qualities of the port of the future.

The faculty comprised experts from the port community of Barcelona, including members of private companies, such as port terminals, and representatives of public institutions, such as the port authority or customs.

Fore more information you can check out the course page https://escolaeuropea.eu/courses/port-operations/.

Port operations in a globalised society

In an era of a globalised supply chain, the role of the port has evolved from its traditional cargo handling and storage functions to being an integral part of the global supply chain. With the growing demand for integrated logistics services and the intensification of port competition, a port must collaborate and cooperate with its supply chain partners to provide value-added services to its customers and, by extension, to its entire regional area of influence.

Today, instead of companies competing with each other, the logistics chains engage in more active competition. Greater efficiency of their operations gives them advantages over their rivals and positions them higher above other companies in the market. In order to identify all the items that make up the most efficient logistics chains, it is necessary to analyse and combine systems, processes, people, teams and strategies in order to find the most profitable and efficient solutions for all parties involved. Economies with efficient logistic solutions can easily connect companies in their territories with national and international markets through reliable supply chains, while countries with inefficient logistics face high costs, both in terms of time and money, in international trade and global supply chains, leaving their companies at great disadvantages.

On an international level, the position of the economies in the logistics sector can be evaluated through the World Bank’s Logistic Performance Index – a tool comprising different KPIs (Key Performance Indicators) that reflect the perceptions of logistics of a country based on the efficiencies of processes of customs clearance, the quality of available commercial and transport infrastructures, the ease of arranging shipments at competitive prices, the quality of logistics services, the ability to track and trace shipments, and the frequency with which shipments arrive at the consignees on time. From this perspective, ports play an essential role, which can only be optimised when all actors and agents collaborate and interact efficiently. We are not only talking about the actions of port authorities; the direct and active participation of shipowners, exporters, importers, shippers, customs agencies, consignment agents, freight forwarders, stevedoring companies, land and multimodal carriers, port and terminal concessionaires, customs authorities, health services, among others is crucial.

Nowadays, the role of a port is not only limited to its port or technological infrastructures, but also to its role as a productive and efficient logistic platform thanks to the integration of all processes and the information capabilities of its actors. In this way, an efficient port becomes an engine for the economy.

This coordination is possible when all the agents of the port community, as well as the rest of the members of the logistics chain, are aware of the roles and responsibilities of each of their interlocutors. This allows the gear between all of them to be much more fluid and efficient. In this sense, the knowledge and training on “what happens in a port” help to generate synergies and process improvements among the participants of the operations, both maritime and terrestrial, and to pave the way for integration, presenting the client as a single entity: the port.

Specialised training in port operations will help increase the efficiency and safety of operations. Ensuring that all actors in the logistics chain are informed of and understand the working procedures will make it easier to find equilibrium between the different actors in order to provide better operation times and greatly reduce operational costs.

As such, the Escola Europea – Intermodal Transport has brought together the main actors that make up and partake in port operations to offer specialised training, with the goal of contributing to the improvement of the efficiency of ports and logistics operations on a national scale. This course is part of the Summer School of the Escola, which will take place from 1 to 12 July, and is divided into two scenarios of port operations: vessel operations and goods operations. During the two weeks, participants will be able to get to know all the actors involved in port operations in order to get a panoramic and integrated view of what happens during the passage of goods through a port.

You can find out more about the upcoming course by exploring the course programmes (https://www.escolaeuropea.eu/calendar/port-operations-for-vessels/

 and https://www.escolaeuropea.eu/calendar/summer-school-port-operations-for-goods/

) , or by writing to the Escola (info@escolaeuropea.eu).

Summer School on Port Operations

The first edition of the Summer School on Port Operations brings together professionals and students

As announced earlier this year, the first week of July saw the conclusion of the first edition of the Summer School on Port Operations. This new course brought to light the activities that take place in the Port of Barcelona, offered a detailed analysis of the operations involved and included a case study on the primary actors and central infrastructures.

The course has a duration of 5 days (25 hours) and follows the Escola’s traditional format complementing theoretical lectures with practical workshops, all of which take place within the port community of Barcelona. The first day of the 2018 Summer School focused on the relationship between the port community and all of the operations that take place, as well as on the services offered to vessels stationed at the port. The subsequent three days were filled with visits to port installations: the participants could visit the pilot control tower, the headquarters of the port police; the MARPOL waste collection facilities of ECOIMSA; and the border inspection point. They could also observe some of the equipment most used in port operations such as the tugboats and the scanners used for container inspection. The theories that sustain the dynamics of the port community and its operations have been presented from the perspective of the maritime transport.

Finally, the security protocols of the port were presented, alongside its Efficiency Network quality label. To conclude the course, the participants explored the fundamental elements needed when designing the port of the future: the environmental aspects of port area management and the energy efficiency strategies applied by the Port Authority of Barcelona.

All of the participants appreciated the unique experienced: “It seemed to me to be very interesting, well thought-out and well-driven by the Escola and its team” said one attendee. “A very complete and didactic course, thanks to the visits we were able to experience first-hand all of the actors that constitute the port” summarised another member of the group at the end of the week.

The teaching staff of the Summer School comprised: Enric Cortada, Director of the Control Tower of Maritime-Port Operations; Bernat Baró, Director of Corporate Security at the Port of Barcelona; José Luis González, Head of Land Operations at the Port of Barcelona; Jordi Vila, Head of Environment at the Port of Barcelona; Carles Rúa, Head of Innovation and Strategy at the Port of Barcelona; Félix González, Head of Management of the Boder Inspection Point; Ramon Rull, Head of Quality at the Port of Barcelona and Eduard Rodés, Director of the Escola Europea.

The Escola Europea is grateful for the support and collaboration received from Tradebe, the Company responsible for the MARPOL waste management, Rebarsa Group, the Pilotage Association, and from the entire port community which is always ready and willing to support the organisation’s training initiatives, no matter how elaborate and ambitious.

For more information you can visit the course page : https://www.escolaeuropea.eu/calendar/summer-school-port-operations/ or write to info@escolaeuropea.eu.

Forma’t al Port fills the Escola’s classrooms in the first quarter of 2018

Three hundred and sixty students of higher education courses from thirteen Catalan institutes have filled the classrooms of the Escola Europea during the seven Introduction courses of the Forma’t al Port project organized so far this year.

The participating institutes were: The UAB Foundation (Fundación UAB), the Centre for Polytechnic Studies; Sant Francesc, Prat and López Vicuña Centres for Studies; La Salle Gràcia, Les Salines, Jaume Mimó, Poblenou, Lluïsa Cura, Estela Ibèrica and  Joan Brossa Institutes as well as the Escola del Treball from Lleida.

The main objective of the two-day-long Introduction course is to supply upper cycle first-year students of International Trade and Transport and Logistics with a first-hand experience of the Port of Barcelona, its infrastructures, logistical equipment and port operations. In addition, the companies of port community have the opportunity to promote their activities and the professional profiles they seek for their work force. Finally, the course creates a space for dialogue to encourage exchanges between training centres and companies, and thus promote the hiring of students in programmes of dual training.

Introduction characterises the first level of the Forma’t al Port programme and is considered preparatory for the more complex three-day-long Management course, during which participants receive training on board of one of the vessels that covers the regular short sea shipping route between Barcelona (Spain) and Genoa (Italy).

The Forma’t al Port project was launched in 2014 in Barcelona by the Port of Barcelona, Barcelona-Catalunya Logistics Centre, the Barcelona Provincial Council (la Diputació de Barcelona) and the Escola Europea. The first triennium of activities took place between 2015-2017 and had a great drawing power, giving very positive results. This paved the way for a new triennium 2018-2020, which welcomes back the centres already loyal to the programme alongside the addition of new institutes.

For more information, you can visit the website of the project: https://www.escolaeuropea.eu/training/our-courses/#format.

Events

Icon- Port Operations Goods

Port Operations for Goods 2022

Training in Port Operations for Goods

Better port services for an efficient Port Community


11 – 15 July 2022

Icon- Port Operations Goods


GENERAL INFORMATION


OBJECTIVES


HOW?


PARTICIPANT’S PROFILE


PROGRAMME


QUESTIONS

PARTICIPANT’S PROFILE


  • Students of port management, nautical and maritime transport, transport management and logistics
  • Early or mid-career ship and port agents wishing to expand their knowledge
  • Shipping company personnel wishing to understand the work of the agent
  • Port terminal personnel wishing to understand how port operations and services work

Some of the companies that entrust the training of their employees with the Escola:


 

GENERAL INFORMATION


11 – 15 July 2020


Port of Barcelona


English

OBJECTIVES

  • To provide training in port operations for vessels and goods.
  • To show port operations and port facilities in detail and from a practical perspective.
  • To offer deep insight into maritime logistics, its actors and roles.
  • To offer deep insight into types of terminals, cargo particularities and cargo inspections.

HOW TO ACHIEVE IT?

  • Analyzing the current situation

    Getting to know all the existing port services and operations and analyzing the relationship and management between operators.

  • Technical Training

    Providing training and information to people who will manage and make decisions in port operations and services to vessels and goods.

  • Practical Workshops

    Giving an eminently practical point of view: showing the participants the main actors in the port, its operations and how they are managed and developed. Allowing students to experience these operations first hand.

This course, based on an experiential learning method, combines:

Lectures - Escola Courses

Conferences

Theoretical classes on topics of interest in port operations, conducted by experts and academics in the sector.

Participants of the Port Operations during a workshop

Visitas

Visitas y talleres prácticos en el buque para ver las operaciones logísticas en directo.


Networking

Specific networking activities between the participants and the experts of the sector.

PROGRAMME


TUITION FEES

General fee: 600€/participant

Fee for participant in the two weeks of the summer school: 500€/participante

The price includes transfers and all the activities described in the programme

*Course subsidized by Fundae (formerly Fundación Tripartita) in case of Spanish companies

#DidYouKnow

Learn more about port operations from the articles in our blog:

Container ship in Port
Smart Cities

For more information…Contact us!


A first class experience, with very professional and experienced instructors in maritime and port operations, as well as excellent people. Navigation was quite productive and contributed greatly to raising our knowledge, so that it could be replicated in our organizations.

Sponsors


 

Collaborators:


 

Training in Port Operations for Goods

Better port services for an efficient Port Community


11 – 15 July 2022

Icon- Port Operations Goods


GENERAL INFORMATION


OBJECTIVES


HOW?


PARTICIPANT’S PROFILE


PROGRAMME


QUESTIONS

PARTICIPANT’S PROFILE


  • Students of port management, nautical and maritime transport, transport management and logistics
  • Early or mid-career ship and port agents wishing to expand their knowledge
  • Shipping company personnel wishing to understand the work of the agent
  • Port terminal personnel wishing to understand how port operations and services work

Some of the companies that entrust the training of their employees with the Escola:


 

GENERAL INFORMATION


11 – 15 July 2020


Port of Barcelona


English

OBJECTIVES

  • To provide training in port operations for vessels and goods.
  • To show port operations and port facilities in detail and from a practical perspective.
  • To offer deep insight into maritime logistics, its actors and roles.
  • To offer deep insight into types of terminals, cargo particularities and cargo inspections.

HOW TO ACHIEVE IT?

  • Analyzing the current situation

    Getting to know all the existing port services and operations and analyzing the relationship and management between operators.

  • Technical Training

    Providing training and information to people who will manage and make decisions in port operations and services to vessels and goods.

  • Practical Workshops

    Giving an eminently practical point of view: showing the participants the main actors in the port, its operations and how they are managed and developed. Allowing students to experience these operations first hand.

This course, based on an experiential learning method, combines:

Lectures - Escola Courses

Conferences

Theoretical classes on topics of interest in port operations, conducted by experts and academics in the sector.

Participants of the Port Operations during a workshop

Visitas

Visitas y talleres prácticos en el buque para ver las operaciones logísticas en directo.


Networking

Specific networking activities between the participants and the experts of the sector.

PROGRAMME


TUITION FEES

General fee: 600€/participant

Fee for participant in the two weeks of the summer school: 500€/participante

The price includes transfers and all the activities described in the programme

*Course subsidized by Fundae (formerly Fundación Tripartita) in case of Spanish companies

#DidYouKnow

Learn more about port operations from the articles in our blog:

Container ship in Port
Smart Cities

For more information…Contact us!


A first class experience, with very professional and experienced instructors in maritime and port operations, as well as excellent people. Navigation was quite productive and contributed greatly to raising our knowledge, so that it could be replicated in our organizations.

Sponsors


 

Collaborators:


 

Icon for the Port Operations for Vessels Summer School

Port Operations for Vessels 2022

Training in Port Operations for vessels

Better port services for an efficient Port Community


04 – 08 July 2022

Icon for the Port Operations for Vessels Summer School


GENERAL INFORMATION


OBJECTIVES


HOW?


PARTICIPANT’S PROFILE


PROGRAMME


QUESTIONS

PARTICIPANT’S PROFILE


  • Students of port management, nautical and maritime transport, transport management and logistics
  • Early or mid-career ship and port agents wishing to expand their knowledge
  • Shipping company personnel wishing to understand the work of the agent
  • Port terminal personnel wishing to understand how port operations and services work

Some of the companies that entrust the training of their employees with the Escola:


 

GENERAL INFORMATION


04 – 08 July 2022


Port of Barcelona


English

OBJECTIVES

  • To provide training in port operations for vessels and goods.
  • To show port operations and port facilities in detail and from a practical perspective.
  • To offer deep insight into maritime logistics, its actors and roles.
  • To offer deep insight into types of terminals, cargo particularities and cargo inspections.

HOW TO ACHIEVE IT?

  • Analyzing the current situation

    Getting to know all the existing port services and operations and analyzing the relationship and management between operators.

  • Technical Training

    Providing training and information to people who will manage and make decisions in port operations and services to vessels and goods.

  • Practical Workshops

    Giving an eminently practical point of view: showing the participants the main actors in the port, its operations and how they are managed and developed. Allowing students to experience these operations first hand.

This course, based on an experiential learning method, combines:

Lectures - Escola Courses

Conferences

Theoretical classes on topics of interest in port operations, conducted by experts and academics in the sector.

Participants of the Port Operations during a workshop

Visitas

Visitas y talleres prácticos en el buque para ver las operaciones logísticas en directo.


Networking

Specific networking activities between the participants and the experts of the sector.

PROGRAMME


TUITION FEES

General fee: 600€/participant

Fee for participants to both Summer School courses: 500€/participant

The price includes transfers and all the activities described in the programme

*Course subsidized by Fundae (formerly Fundación Tripartita) in case of Spanish companies

#DidYouKnow

Check out some of our blog posts about Port Operations:

Container ship in Port
Smart Cities

For more information…Contact us!


A first class experience, with very professional and experienced instructors in maritime and port operations, as well as excellent people. Navigation was quite productive and contributed greatly to raising our knowledge, so that it could be replicated in our organizations.

Sponsors


 

Collaborators:


 

#DidYouKnow – The increasing threat of cyber attacks on port

Living in an increasingly digitised world has decreased distances between countries. The world doesn’t seem to be vast anymore – countries in the northern hemisphere can get tropical fruits from the southern hemisphere (and vice versa) at a few days’ notice. Communication between different countries has become instantaneous. The increasing innovations have made our planet seem a lot smaller.

The port sector has also been riding this innovation wave. In the final years of the twentieth century, and in the first decades of the twenty first century, ports have been going through a digital transformation to keep up with any new challenges, optimising their operations and creating new strategies (including automation, RFID tagging, etc). All of this has been centred on the ability to interconnect information technologies and operation technologies, cloud computing, the internet of things, big data, among others.

All this modernisation has come at a price – and digital innovation has given rise to cyber threats and cyber-attacks. This has not left any industries unaffected. Ports, as vital infrastructure points to nation-states – have become frequent targets to both national, international and clandestine attacks. During their own digitalisation efforts, ports need to ensure that cybersecurity stays at the forefront, whilst being considered a facilitator of automation and future developments. The transition into the digital sphere has thus morphed into cybersecurity challenges that ports need to address before realising the complete potential of innovative technologies. This is why we decided to deal with cybersecurity in ports for this month’s #DidYouKnow article.

What kinds of cyber threats exist for ports?

Making sure that ports are safe from cyber threats is critical towards ensuring safe and secure operations of ships both at sea and onshore. This is not a new issue – the International Maritime Organization (IMO) has already adopted various resolutions that aim to minimize (if not eliminate) cyber risks in the maritime industry. For example, under the IMO’s resolution MSC.428(98), port administrations need to ensure that the systems that are in place in their communities appropriately address any risks or security concerns for vessels that may exist in cyberspace. This is because port operations are vital in international and national maritime trade. It is within their boundaries that vessels arrive, load, and unload their cargoes, top up fuel, and carry out other vital information towards the proper functioning of the global supply chain.

In the modern digital world, port cybersecurity must be seen as a top priority for any transport operation

There are many types of cyber risks that can affect ports and their operations. These can be grouped the following 7 categories (which are by no means finite as the digital sphere is a constantly evolving creature).

  • Eavesdropping, interception, hijacking -This group of risks includes, but is not limited to, incidents such as the interception of emissions, sensitive information, network reconnaissance, network traffic manipulation, etc.
  • Nefarious activity & abuse – This group of risks includes, but is not limited to, incidents such as the denial of service, malware, brute force, identity theft, phishing, targeted attacks, abuse and theft of data, manipulation of information, etc.
  • Disaster – These risks can emerge as a result of environmental disasters, natural disasters, etc.
  • Unintentional damage – These can include the use of unreliable sources, erroneous administration of IT/OT systems, information leakage, among others.
  • Failures and Malfunctions – Any information system always has the potential to fail or malfunction. This group of risks includes failures to systems, devices, navigation and communication systems, main supply systems, failure or disruption of service providers, etc.
  • Outages – As information and digital systems depend on the energy grids, these risks include any possible main supply outages, network outages, absence of personnel, loss of support, etc.
  • Physical attacks – perhaps the group most associated with the general term of “cyberattacks”. This category includes fraud, sabotage, vandalism, theft, unauthorised access, terrorism, hacktivism, piracy, coercion, extortion, or corruption

What are the legal frameworks?

IMO Resolutions

Providing worldwide cybersecurity guidance for ports is the International Maritime Organization. Various resolutions have already been passed by the organisation to try to create standards for ports and shipping lines to follow to ensure maximum cyber security and cyber regulatory frameworks that minimise the risks for all parties, including ISO/IEC 27001 and the Guidelines on Cyber Security on Board Ships.

SOLAS

SOLAS – or the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea – is a treaty that has established the minimum safety standards for shipping. It covers requirements for equipment, construction, and the general operation of vessels. It has been adopted by over 150 nation-states. In terms of cyber security, its Chapter IX — Management for the Safe Operation of Ships — requires every shipping line and any person or company that is responsible for a vessel to comply with the International Safety Management Code (ISM). This code has been adapted to include sections on cybersecurity concerns.

ENISA

ENISA is the European Union Agency for Cybersecurity. In 2019 its position was strengthened with the EU Cybersecurity Act, which also defined a general framework for Information, Communication and Technology products, processes, and services. All EU member states need to comply with the ENISA requirements, though there are some that have also adopted their own national initiatives to further shield themselves from cyber risks. This includes the French CIIP law, the German “IT-Grundschutz” and the UL Cyber Security Code of Practices, among others.

 

Conclusions

This #DidYouKnow article is by no means an extensive deep-dive into the world of cyber security – as it is a very broad and complex topic that only specialised cyber professionals could explain. It does offer, nevertheless, a glimpse into the complexity of issues that arose with the digitalisation of our modern world.

Ports are not immune to the cyber risks, no matter how digitised and seemingly prepared they are. Most of such attacks involve people and fragmented system landscapes, and therefore every port community is potentially at risk. The digital divide shouldn’t be ignored – and the fact that the maritime world is central to keeping global supply chains moving and thus is crucial to information exchanges associated with them further highlights the shared nature of cybersecurity risks. Therefore, for the maritime world to function effectively, the management of cyber risks must be carried out properly and shared with all stakeholders, ranging from port authorities, shipping operators, port facilities and terminals, maritime agencies, customs agents and maritime law enforcement agencies. The cyberworld does not have physical borders, and therefore the mitigation of any threats there is trickier.

Cybersecurity in port operations is no easy (nor isolated) feat. It is essential for all partners involved in transport operations to be aware of the risks involved and to learn to take the necessary steps to prevent or stop any potential threats that may develop. This includes following good practices that certain port operators may establish to reach a baseline of cybersecurity. In 2020, the port industry has faced a fourfold increase in cyber attacks against OT systems (a fourfold increase from 2017). Cyber-attacks are unfortunately becoming common. Therefore it is important to note that, at the end of the day, port operations and cybersecurity in the twenty first century are two sides of the same coin.

Intrigued? The Escola Europea is organising a summer school in port operations – with a focus on vessels and goods that are processed through the Port of Barcelona in the month of July. In the course we go over all the aspects of port operations, including the new cyber threats and their mitigation procedures. Check out the programme on our website.

Sources:

Forma't al Port Management - December 2021

Discovering the Port and Forma’t al Port: teachers and students get to know the Port of Barcelona in the final weeks of the year

The Forma’t al Port programme managed to recover the numbers of students trained pre-pandemic and trained 590 students in a single year; while the “Discover the Port” initiative was born to give visibility to the port professions to educators.

The Discover the Port initiative has been born with the help of the Port of Barcelona, the Escola Europea and the actors of the training and occupation board of the logistics-port community of Barcelona. Through this programme more than 40 teachers and educators of institutes of Barcelona have been able to learn about the new strategic plan of the Port of Barcelona, along with the update of the study of professional profiles of the port community of Barcelona and that of the infrastructures and companies that accommodate new job opportunities for young people in the area.

This programme aims to inform teachers of the professional profiles that are most in demand and difficult to cover, in order for them to be able to identify and guide potential candidates for these jobs and advise them in their academic and professional career.

Similarly, for students already familiar with the sector, the Forma’t al Port programme was reinvented in a hybrid format to bring the Port of Barcelona and its activities closer to students of Transport and Logistics and International Trade, and to students of the Logistics and Maritime Business Degree, both virtually and in person during the year of health-crisis related restrictions.

In the first half of the year, 530 students attended the Forma’t al Port – Introduction course, which consists of lectures by the different players in the port logistics community, as well as virtual visits to the Port of Barcelona. The students also got to know the Port’s facilities in person through a visit scheduled during a pandemic-safe period of the year.

At the end of the year, in November and December, the Forma’t training returned to its original 100% classroom format and two editions of the Forma’t al Port – Management course were held on board GNV and Grimaldi Lines vessels with a total of 60 participants. The experience proved to be very enriching, as the students were able to interact with their peers from different institutes and the trainers in a safe space.

In view of the success of the programme in recent years, several training centres have applied for partnership in order to be able to offer their students this specialised training. The Escola Europea, the organiser of the courses, is looking for new local sponsors to increase the number of centres and students who can take the courses.

In 2022 the Escola’s team plans to restart face-to-face activities, if the situation permits, and to continue the work of bringing the Barcelona port-logistics community closer to its future professionals.

For more information about Forma’t al Port courses, please contact the programme manager: Marta Miquel – marta.miquel@escolaeuropea.eu.

Diploma ceremony held on the 3rd of July 2021

Escola’s restarts its MOST courses

Last Saturday, on the 3rd of July, the intermodal transport course “Motorways of the Sea training – MOST” started in Barcelona. In total, thirty five students from 11 different nationalities studying Master’s programmes in Logistics and International Trade, Internationalisation of SMEs and Customs Law and Management at the University of Barcelona participated in the 4-day long training.

The day began with a solemn ceremony to present diplomas to some 100 graduates which, exceptionally and due to health safety measures, was held outdoors in front of the Escola Europea’s headquarters, at Placeta de l’Areté, Terminal Drassanes on the Moll de Barcelona.  On behalf of the Port of Barcelona and the Escola, its director, Eduard Rodés, welcomed the participants.  On behalf of the University of Barcelona, Dr. Oscar Mascarilla, director of the Master’s programmes, spoke. The Honourable Ramon Tremosa, Minister of Business and Knowledge of the Generalitat de Catalunya until a few weeks ago, supported the event and addressed the students, encouraging them to put their knowledge at the service of the competitiveness of their respective countries. Afterwards, the participants and their accompanying family members made a maritime visit to the Port of Barcelona.

The MOST course started early in the afternoon on the same day, and the group departed for Civitavecchia – the port of Rome – on board of the Grimaldi RO-PAX vessel “Cruise Barcelona”. The teachers of the Escola Europea on this occasion were Marta Miquel, the Chief Operating Officer, Antonio Vargas, representing Grimaldi Lines and Eduard Rodés, as course director.

Simultaneously, the first two weeks of July saw the start of the Escola’s annual Summer School in Port Operations for Vessels and for Goods. The course is held in classroom in-person format with the participation of 16 students from Egypt, Yemen and Somalia.

The MOST course is the first on-board course that the Escola was able to hold since the start of the pandemic in March 2020. It is a promising sign showing the ability of the Escola to begin to bring its unique experiential courses back into play.

Container ship in Port

The road towards sustainable port operations

This month, in anticipation of our annual summer school on port operations, we thought we would tackle the topic of sustainable ports, with a break down of practical measures being taken by ports to reach net-zero emissions in the next three decades.

Written by

Written by: Lidia Slawinska, Consultant

In recent years, smart and sustainable have become interchangeable when talking about the future of transport. With the goal of working towards a more connected, intelligent and sustainable world, port authorities and port operators across the globe have been actively working in line with the UN’s 17 Sustainable Development Goals which work to improve financial and social inclusion, support humanitarian efforts, facilitate access to education and to health services, and to combat climate change. All partners have agreed that this is necessary to help build a sustainable world for future generations – and actors involved in transport operations have a particularly large part to play.

The IMO has predicted in recent years that maritime transport will continue to increase over the next decades, culminating with a rate 250% higher in 2050 than what we see today. Knowing that maritime transport already contributes nearly 3% of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions, it is evident that the industry needs to change to ensure that the increased rate does not counterbalance any global sustainability efforts.

Ports play a key role in the development and maintenance of efficient and supply chains, and therefore they will also play a key role in their redesigns to make them sustainable in the effort to achieve net zero emissions of shipping operations by 2050. One way that ports have started to do that is to invest in electrification.

Ports as energy hubs

Container operations at the Port of Rotterdam

Container operations at the Port of Rotterdam

The concept of having ports used as energy hubs for the shipping world is an enticing one. Imagining that the infrastructure could serve as a sustainable operation, with electrified terminals, reach stackers, loading cranes, etc., and then knowing that the onshore power supply points could also help maintain low emissions of vessels in port and at sea is very appealing. Digitalisation will be the enabler of this process of bringing electricity closer to the different intermodal transport modes through ports – through electrification processes – and will open doors to new innovative solutions, alternative business strategies and intelligent controls. Connected carries, cargo and people will make sure that transport transactions are transparent, traceable, and trustworthy. Ports can serve as the energy hubs that make all of this possible.

Electrification

Electrification is already spreading through the shipping world. It can be done to ships to make sure that they consume fewer fossil fuels and therefore lower their carbon footprint. Other forms of transport, as well as the supporting infrastructure provided by ports, if electrified, can substantially help increase the sustainability of maritime operations. As an added bonus, electrified ports also emit lower noise pollution, therewith improving their relationships with the neighbouring cities.

Electrification is also inextricably linked to sustainability. As more and more carriers invest in either fully electric or hybrid motors, ports are expected to offer onshore power supply stations, which in turn puts more demand on the creation of relevant infrastructures. As a result, those ports that invest in the innovative infrastructures transform into important nodes with substantial power needs which would need to be taken from a nearby electricity grids. This is because visiting ships, regardless of the duration of their stays in the port, will want to recharge their batteries to make sure that they have enough energy for subsequent transport legs all the while getting energy to support their stays in the ports themselves. As a result, ports will become large electricity consumers, ready to cater for both large and alternating load requirements – all of which will depend on the stability of the electricity supply.

One example of a European port that has successfully incorporated electrification efforts is that of the Port of Tyne in the Northeast of England. Its electrification projects, among other initiatives that helped it win the UK Clean Maritime Operator Award in 2020, have contributed to the cutting of the port’s fossil fuel consumption by 260,000 litres, reducing energy use by 2.3 million kWh and eliminating more than 1,500 tonnes of carbon dioxide.

New technologies moving ports closer to full electrification

Alongside onshore power supply points, there are other technological developments that are helping ports on the path towards full electrification. One such development was recently announced by Hyster Europe, during the TOC Global Showcase. Having spent years working on zero-emission container handling solutions, Hyster’s catalogue of port equipment that utilises lithium-ion batteries and other fuel cell technologies got more extensive. Having partnered up with Capacity Trucks, Hyster is now working on the creation of electric, hydrogen and automation ready terminal tractors. The most interesting part of these developments is the use of hydrogen fuel cells – something that the company has been investing in and working on since 2017.

The Ports of Auckland Ltd is another example of bringing ports closer to the innovative and sustainable solutions of tomorrow. With an impressive goal of reaching zero emissions by 2040, the port operator has incorporated a wide range of solutions including automated straddle carriers and expanding the terminal’s overall annual capacity. Alongside this, the port has invested in fully electric tugboats, built by Damen Shipyards and powered by Echandia’s E-LTO batteries, which can sustain more than 70 tonnes of bollard pull.

Etug at the Ports of Auckland

Credit: Damen Shipyards

More efficient port management

Apart from investing in new technologies to reach their sustainability goals, ports also need to optimise their port processes and operating procedures to improve turnaround time, decrease time spent idling in ports, and therewith improving the overall maritime transport operation. Digitalisation is key in this – as ensuring smooth and reliable digital connectivity between all transport operators can only help make the planning and follow-throughs of any processes more efficient.

5G is already being tested to try to increase the speed of data exchanges between different transport parties, with the Internet of Things, AI, and digital twins set to help increase the overall reliability of port operations, and therewith contribute towards efficient port management models.

Concluding thoughts

It is not a secret that the maritime sector accounts for around 3 percent of the word’s total GHG emissions. As most the world’s transport relies on the maritime route (and the current trend shows the number increasing significantly in the next 3 decades), it is imperative for any actors involved in maritime operations to make sure that fossil fuels are eliminated (to the extent that it is possible) and substituted (or complemented by) renewable alternatives. As maritime transport does not exist without ports, bringing sustainability to them seems like a necessity to help greenify the sector. Electrification and digitalisation are two such steps that ports can take to work towards that goal – and therewith ensure a clean and green supply chain that supports our globalised world.

Sources:

The Ship Agent

When we think about the arrival of a vessel to the port, the first thing we think about is the loading or discharging of the cargo. Even though this is not entirely incorrect, many ships have more specific requirements and needs upon arrival. This is where the role of the ship agent comes in, and this is what we chose to focus on in this post for our #DidYouKnow series.

Sustainable Development Goals wheel

The Escola Europea reaffirms its commitment to training and the Motorways of the Sea

Days away from 2020, the Escola Europea reflects on the achievements made during the year. The Sustainable Development Goals have been set to solidify the urgent changes that society would need to make to tackle social inequality, climate change, poverty, and political turmoil, among others.

With this in light, the Escola’s work this year can be summarised as follows:

  • In 2019, the Escola has organised a staggering 42 courses (nearing one course per week), and welcomed participants from Spain, Belgium, Italy, France, the Netherlands, Morocco, Algeria, Peru, Colombia and Mexico. There was an increase in the number of participants coming from the Magred, which could be explained with the success of the TransLogMED project and the growth of the North African trade networks. In total, 1,485 students passed through the Escola’s doors and took advantage of the unique course-workshops.
  • 2019 also saw the creation and fulfilment of new technical courses. Curricula and course programmes were prepared for the Temperature-Controlled Freight transport Course, detailed plan were made for the Port Operations Summer school (which now took the form of a 2 week course, separated by vessels and goods), and the Groupage and Consolidation Course was further extended. Successful courses were also carried out for the former two technical courses, with a Groupage course planned for the spring of 2020.
  • The Escola’s courses are constantly undergoing improvements and modifications. In 2019 the team created a Log Book to give to the students at the start of each course, which contains tasks, puzzles and activities that further enrich the participants’ experiences.
  • Formati al Porto was officially launched in Italy, demonstrating the huge success the programme has attained in Barcelona and its appeal to other termional communities.
  • The Escola has had it’s first paper published in a conference – the annual World of Shipping International Research Conference on Maritime Affairs. The paper, which can be found here, summarised the current state of experiential training methods in Europe, and provided a quantitative analysis of the approach applied to the Escola’s courses. Thank you to all of the Escola’s partners and alumni who have generously submitted their survey responses to help us carry out the study.

2020 shows all signs of being a very intensive one for the Escola Europea, with technical courses for professionals planned for the spring, the summer school, and the usual MOST courses in the autumn. In the past decade, the organisation has increased its influence in Europe and throughout the Mediterranean through the development of new and innovative courses for students and professionals, the signing of new agreements with influential universities and training centres, and the active participation in European projects, and 2019 has shown that it is continuing to do so, whilst applying the Sustainable Development Goals to its activities.

For more information, visit the Escola’s website at www.escolaeuropea.eu or write to info@escolaeuropea.eu.

Participants of the Port Operations during a workshop

The Escola Europea completes the first semester of course with the Summer School in Port Operations

With the arrival of summer, the Escola ended its activities in the first semester of 2019. The past few months have been very busy for the training centre, providing specialised training to both students and professionals in the sector.

During these 6 months, more than 1100 students from Europe, Latin America and North Africa have attended 28 courses to receive training in maritime and rail intermodality, temperature-controlled supply chains and port operations.

During the first two weeks of July, the Escola has welcomed professionals and students of different nationalities to the Summer School in Port Operations. The course consisted of two weeks, each with a specific focus: the first on services to vessels and the second on freight operations in ports.

The training, in addition to including practical workshops to different places in the port of Barcelona, such as visits to the control tower, the border inspection point, the tugboat facilities, as well as terminals for each type of merchandise, has allowed participants to uncover the theories that underpin the dynamics of the port community and its operations from the perspective of terminals, cargo and agents.

The participants became familiar with the services offered to ships, port security protocols, customs procedures, and risk management of dangerous products and emergencies. They have also been introduced to the environmental aspects of port area management so that they can begin to consider the qualities of the port of the future.

The faculty comprised experts from the port community of Barcelona, including members of private companies, such as port terminals, and representatives of public institutions, such as the port authority or customs.

Fore more information you can check out the course page https://escolaeuropea.eu/courses/port-operations/.

Summer School: Port Operations for goods

Objective


International maritime transport costs tend to be on average between two to three times as high as the custom duties of importing countries. Even so it is the cheapest way of transporting large amounts of goods compared with other transport methods.

Understanding port operations for goods is essential for the sector. This is why the Escola chose to give professionals and students the opportunity to gain valuable knowledge around this subject, which will prove useful in the short-term and vital in the long-term.


Specifically


  • To provide training in port operations for goods
  • To show port operations and port facilities in detail and from a practical perspective
  • To offer deep insight to types of terminals, cargo particularities and cargo inspections

Participant Profile


  • Students of port management, nautical and maritime transport, transport management and logistics
  • Early or mid-career ship and port agents wishing to expand their knowledge
  • Shipping company personnel wishing to understand the work of the agent
  • Port terminal personnel wishing to understand how  port operations and services work


When?

8-12 of July 2019

Where?

Port of Barcelona

Language:

English

Price

  • 600€/ pers.
    * Registration for the two weeks of the Summer School (Vessels & Goods) will result in a 200€ discount for the two courses.




Lectures


Theoretical classes on port operations and on the port commununity given by professionals active in the sector.


Visits


Visits and workshops to port terminals and operational areas.


Networking


Networking activities and collaborative team work.

Theoretical Contents


  • Introduction: cargoes and their peculiarities
  • Port security: areas division, regulations and planning
  • Maritime assurances
  • Infrastructure and functions of the Border Inspection Post
  • EQ (containers, vehicles, marpol)
  • Risk management: dangerous goods and emergencies
  • Passenger services / loading and unloading of vehicles
  • PORTIC
  • Land services to the merchandise: rail/ schedules of pick up truck

Workshops


  • Visit to the terminals:
    • Containers – BEST Terminal
    • Cars- Autoterminal
    • Chemicals – Decal
    • Solid Bulk cargo – ICL
  • Visit to port facilities:
    • PIF
    • Scanner
    • Terminal Multipurpose – Portnou

Programme


09:00 Welcome at the Escola Europea
09:15 Introduction: cargoes and their particularities
10:30 Port Security: areas division, regulations and planning
11:30 Break
12:00 Maritime assurances
14:00 End of the day

With the collaboration of: